PhyloPic Phryday Photo

PhyloPic Phryday Photo

Cucurbita pepo by Evan Swigart (photography) and T. Michael Keesey (vectorization)

Where are the senior women in STEM? | Dawn Bazely

So, here\’s the thing: I\’m a female Biology professor, and when I was an undergraduate (1977-81 UofT), there were more or less 50:50 male to female students in my classes. This bottom-up input of women into Biology has been happening for decades. So, thirty years on, where are the other female Full Professors? In fact, where are the senior women in the government, industry and even in Biology-related NGOs?

via Where are the senior women in STEM? | Dawn Bazely.

Lethal Autonomous Robots (“Killer Robots”) | Center for Ethics & Technology | Georgia Institute of Technology | Atlanta, GA

Lethal Autonomous Robots (\”Killer Robots\”)

Monday, 18 November 2013 05:00 pm to 07:00 pm EST

Location: 

Global Learning Center (in Tech Square), room 129

WATCH the simultaneously streamed WEBCAST at: 

http://proed.pe.gatech.edu/gtpe/pelive/tech_debate_111813/

Debate and Q&A for both

Lethal Autonomous Robots (LARs) are machines that can decide to kill. Such a technology has the potential to revolutionize modern warfare and more. The need for understanding LARs is essential to decide whether their development and possible deployment should be regulated or banned. Are LARs ethical?

via Lethal Autonomous Robots ("Killer Robots") | Center for Ethics & Technology | Georgia Institute of Technology | Atlanta, GA.

What’s Impact? Whose Specialty?

I gave a webinar presentation yesterday for ASERL. It was recorded and can be viewed here.

Here’s the abstract:

What’s ‘Impact’? Whose Speciality? J. Britt Holbrook, Visiting Assistant Professor in the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology, discusses his research on developing indicators for the impact of scholarly communication. Holbrook argues that, although libraries, librarians, and information scientists can play a useful role in developing such indicators, there are inherent risks in too much standardization. Our common goal should be to develop impact indicators that maximize the creativity and freedom of individuals to conduct excellent research.

Comments welcome, of course.

PhyloPic Phryday Photo

PhyloPic Phryday Photo

Cryolophosaurus by Brad McFeeters (vectorized by T. Michael Keesey)

Apparently NSF Grant Applicants Still Allergic To Broader Impacts

Pasco Phronesis

The Consortium of Social Science Associations held its Annual Colloquium on Social And Behavioral Sciences and Public Policy earlier this week.  Amongst the speakers was Acting National Science Foundation (NSF) Director Cora Marrett.* As part of her remarks, she addressed how the Foundation was implementing the Coburn Amendment, which added additional criteria to funding political science research projects through NSF.

The first batch of reviews subject to these new requirements tookplace in early 2013.  In addition to the usual criteria of intellectual merit and broader impacts, the reviewers looked at the ‘most meritorious’ proposals and examined how they contribute to economic development and/or national security.  For the reviews scheduled for early 2014, all three ‘criteria’ will be reviewed at once.

Since researchers don’t like to be told what to do, they aren’t happy.  But Marrett asserts through her remarks that this additional review will not really affect the…

View original post 183 more words

‘Big Data’ Is Bunk, Obama Campaign’s Tech Guru Tells University Leaders – Wired Campus – The Chronicle of Higher Education

“The ‘big’ there is purely marketing,” Mr. Reed said. “This is all fear … This is about you buying big expensive servers and whatnot.”

via 'Big Data' Is Bunk, Obama Campaign's Tech Guru Tells University Leaders – Wired Campus – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Also funny what he says about his own education ….