What a difference a day makes: How social media is transforming scientific debate (with tweets) · deevybee · Storify

This is definitely worth a look, whether you’re into the idea of post-publication peer review or not.

What a difference a day makes: How social media is transforming scientific debate (with tweets) · deevybee · Storify.

Me on the Web, According to ImpactStory.org and Altmetric.com

Impact Story is one of the two altmetrics tools that allow individual researchers to find out something about the social media buzz surrounding their activities; the other is Altmetric.com. Although other developers exist, I can’t seem to figure out how I, as an individual, can use their tools (I’m looking at you, Plum Analytics).

There are a few major differences between Impact Story and Altmetric.com from a user standpoint. First, Impact Story is not for profit, while Altmetric.com is a business. Second, Impact Story steers one to create a collection of products that together tell a story of one’s impact. Altmetric.com, on the other hand, steers one to generate figures for the impact of individual products. Third, Impact Story allows for a range of products, including those tagged with URLs as well as DOIs; Altmetric.com only works with DOIs. This means that Impact Story can gather info on things like blog posts, while Altmetric.com is focused on scholarly articles. Finally, and this is a big difference, Impact Story deemphasizes numbers, while Atlmetric.com assigns a number, the Altmetric score, to each product.

Here is my latest Impact Story.

Here is one of my products according to Altmetric; here’s another; and another.

It’s interesting to see how Impact Story and Altmetric differ, both in their approaches and in terms of what they find on the same products.

I think the implications of these tools are enormous. I’d be interested to hear your thoughts!

PLOS Biology: Expert Failure: Re-evaluating Research Assessment

Do what you can today; help disrupt and redesign the scientific norms around how we assess, search, and filter science.

via PLOS Biology: Expert Failure: Re-evaluating Research Assessment.

You know, I’m generally in favor of this idea — at least of the idea that we ought to redesign our assessment of research (science in the broad sense). But, as one might expect when speaking of design, the devil is in the details. It would be disastrous, for instance, to throw the baby of peer review out with the bathwater of bias.

I touch on the issue of bias in peer review in this article (coauthored with Steven Hrotic). I suggest that attacks on peer review are attacks on one of the biggest safeguards of academic autonomy here (coauthored with Robert Frodeman). On the relation between peer review and the values of autonomy and accountability, see: J. Britt Holbrook (2010). “Peer Review,” in The Oxford Handbook of Interdisciplinarity, Robert Frodeman, Julie Thompson Klein, Carl Mitcham, eds. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 321-32 and J. Britt Holbrook (2012). “Re-assessing the science – society relation: The case of the US National Science Foundation’s broader impacts merit review criterion (1997 – 2011),” in Peer Review, Research Integrity, and the Governance of Science – Practice, Theory, and Current Discussions. Robert Frodeman, J. Britt Holbrook, Carl Mitcham, and Hong Xiaonan. Beijing: People’s Publishing House: 328 – 62. 

Developing Metrics for the Evaluation of Individual Researchers – Should Bibliometricians Be Left to Their Own Devices?

So, I am sorry to have missed most of the Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy. On the other hand, I wouldn’t trade my involvement with the AAAS Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility for any other academic opportunity. I love the CSFR meetings, and I think we may even be able to make a difference occasionally. I always leave the meetings energized and thinking about what I can do next.

That said, I am really happy to be on my way back to the ATL to participate in the last day of the Atlanta Conference. Ismael Rafols asked me to participate in a roundtable discussion with Cassidy Sugimoto and him (to be chaired by Diana Hicks). Like I’d say ‘no’ to that invitation!

The topic will be the recent discussions among bibliometricians of the development of metrics for individual researchers. That sounds like a great conversation to me! Of course, when I indicated to Ismael that I was bascially against the idea of bibliometricians coming up with standards for individual-level metrics, Ismael laughed and said the conversation should be interesting.

I’m not going to present a paper; just some thoughts. But I did start writing on the plane. Here’s what I have so far:

Bibliometrics are now increasingly being used in ways that go beyond their design. Bibliometricians are now increasingly asking how they should react to such unintended uses of the tools they developed. The issue of unintended consequences – especially of technologies designed with one purpose in mind, but which can be repurposed – is not new, of course. And bibliometricians have been asking questions – ethical questions, but also policy questions – essentially since the beginning of the development of bibliometrics. If anyone is sensitive to the fact that numbers are not neutral, it is surely the bibliometricians.

This sensitivity to numbers, however, especially when combined with great technical skill and large data sets, can also be a weakness. Bibliometricians are also aware of this phenomenon, though perhaps to a lesser degree than one might like. There are exceptions. The discussion by Paul Wouters, Wolfgang Glänzel, Jochen Gläser, and Ismael Rafols regarding this “urgent debate in bibliometrics,” is one indication of such awareness. Recent sessions at ISSI in Vienna and STI2013 in Berlin on which Wouters et al. report are other indicators that the bibliometrics community feels a sense of urgency, especially with regard to the question of measuring the performance of individual researchers.

That such questions are being raised and discussed by bibliometricians is certainly a positive development. One cannot fault bibliometricians for wanting to take responsibility for the unintended consequences of their own inventions. But one – I would prefer to say ‘we’ – cannot allow this responsibility to be assumed only by members of the bibliometrics community.

It’s not so much that I don’t want to blame them for not having thought through possible other uses of their metrics — holding them to what Carl Mitcham calls a duty plus respicare: to take more into account than the purpose for which something was initially designed. It’s that I don’t want to leave it to them to try to fix things. Bibliometricians, after all, are a disciplinary community. They have standards; but I worry they also think their standards ought to be the standards. That’s the same sort of naivety that got us in this mess in the first place.

Look, if you’re going to invent a device someone else can command (deans and provosts with research evaluation metrics are like teenagers driving cars), you ought at least to have thought about how those others might use it in ways you didn’t intend. But since you didn’t, don’t try to come in now with your standards as if you know best.

Bibliometrics are not the province of bibliometricians anymore. They’re part of academe. And we academics need to take ownership of them. We shouldn’t let administrators drive in our neighborhoods without some sort of oversight. We should learn to drive ourselves so we can determine the rules of the road. If the bibliometricians want to help, that’s cool. But I am not going to let the Fordists figure out academe for me.

With the development of individual level bibliometrics, we now have the ability — and the interest — to own our own metrics. What we want to avoid at all costs is having metrics take over our world so that they end up steering us rather than us driving them. We don’t want what’s happened with the car to happen with bibliometrics. What we want is to stop at the level at which bibliometrics of individual researchers maximize the power and creativity of individual researchers. Once we standardize metrics, it makes it that much easier to institutionalize them.

It’s not metrics themselves that we academics should resist. ‘Impact’ is a great opportunity, if we own it. But by all means, we should resist the institutionalization of standardized metrics. A first step is to resist their standardization.

Altmetrics — Meretricious or Meritorious?

I think Jeffrey Beall has got this wrong. He claims that altmetrics are an “Ill-conceived and Meretricious Idea.”

On the other hand, I think Euan Adie has got this right. Here is his measured response (sorry, couldn’t resist) to Beall.

So, I come down on the meritorious side. Of course, none of this is to say that altmetrics are without flaws. But one thing they are decidedly good for is connecting academic researchers to those who read their research. That’s what scholarly communication is all about, in my book (sorry again).

On being tweeted to the top

Our results show that scientists who interacted more frequently with journalists had higher h-indices, as did scientists whose work was mentioned on Twitter. Interestingly, however, our data also showed an amplification effect. Furthermore, interactions with journalists had a significantly higher impact on h-index for those scientists who were also mentioned on the micro-blogging platform than for those who were not, suggesting that social media can further amplify the impact of more traditional outlets.

via Opinion: Tweeting to the Top | The Scientist Magazine®.

I’m surprised there’s no mention of altmetrics in this piece. Results are relevant for altmetrics, though. Hoping they’ve published the study in more detail somewhere so I can check it out.

In any case, this is a quick and thought-provoking read — though it appears that it’s more about being tweeted to the top than tweeting to the top (two are interestingly related, however, I suspect).

Snowflake Indicators | Postmodern Research Evaluation | Part 5 of ?

No two snowflakes are alike. No two people are the same.

                                                                                                   — Horshack

Image

                                                                Snowflakes by Juliancolton2 on flickr

Earlier posts in this series attempted to lay out the ways in which Snowball Metrics present as a totalizing grand narrative of research evaluation. Along with attempting to establish a “recipe” that anyone can follow — or that everyone must follow? — in order to evaluate research, this grand narrative appeals to the fact that it is based on a consensus in order to indicate that it is actually fair.

The contrast is between ‘us’ deciding on such a recipe ourselves or having such a recipe imposed on ‘us’ from the outside. ‘We’ decided on the Snowball Metrics recipe based on a consultative method. Everything is on the up and up. Something similar seems to be in the works regarding the use of altmetrics. Personally, I have my doubts about the advisability of standardizing altmetrics.

— But what’s the alternative to using a consultative method to arrive at agreed upon standards for measuring research impact? I mean, it’s either that, or anarchy, or imposition from outside — right?! We don’t want to have standards imposed on us, and we can’t allow anarchy, so ….

Yes, yes, QED. I get it — really, I do. And I don’t have a problem with getting together to talk about things. But must that conversation be methodized? And do we have to reach a consensus?

— Without consensus, it’ll be anarchy!

I don’t think so. I think there’s another alternative we’re not considering. And no, it’s not imposition of standards on us from the ‘outside’ that I’m advocating, either. I think there’s a fourth alternative.

SNOWFLAKE INDICATORS

In contrast to Snowball Metrics, Snowflake Indicators are a delicate combination of science and art (as is cooking, for that matter — something that ought not necessarily involve following a recipe, either! Just a hint for some of those chefs in The Scholarly Kitchen, which sometimes has a tendency to resemble America’s Test Kitchen — a show I watch, along with others, but not so I can simply follow the recipes.). Snowflake Indicators also respect individuality. The point is not to mash the snowflakes together — following the 6-step recipe, of course — to form the perfect snowball. Instead, the point is to let the individual researcher appear as such. In this sense, Snowflake Indicators provide answers to the question of researcher identity. ORCID gets this point, I think.

To say that Snowflake Indicators answer the question of researcher identity is not to suggest that researchers ought to be seen as isolated individuals, however. Who we are is revealed in communication with each other. I really like that Andy Miah’s CV includes a section that lists places in which his work is cited as “an indication of my peer community.” This would count as a Snowflake Indicator.

Altmetrics might also do the trick, depending on how they’re used. Personally, I find it useful to see who is paying attention to what I write or say. The sort of information provided by Altmetric.com at the article level is great. It gives some indication of the buzz surrounding an article, and provides another sort of indicator of one’s peer community. That helps an individual researcher learn more about her audience — something that helps communication, and thus helps a researcher establish her identity. Being able to use ImpactStory.org to craft a narrative of one’s impact — and it’s especially useful not to be tied down to a DOI sometimes — is also incredibly revealing. Used by an individual researcher to craft a narrative of her research, altmetrics also count as Snowflake Indicators.

So, what distinguishes a Snowflake Indicator from a Snowball Metric? It’s tempting to say that it’s the level of measurement. Snowball Metrics are intended for evaluation at a department or university-wide level, or perhaps even at a higher level of aggregation, rather than for the evaluation of individual researchers. Snowflake Indicators, at least in the way I’ve described them above, seem to be aimed at the level of the individual researcher, or even at individual articles. I think there’s something to that, though I also think it might be possible to aggregate Snowflake Indicators in ways that respect idiosyncrasies but that would still allow for meaningful evaluation (more on that in a future post — but for a hint, contrast this advice on making snowballs, where humor and fun make a real difference, with the 6-step process linked above).

But I think that difference in scale misses the really important difference. Where Snowball Metrics aim to make us all comparable, Snowflake Indicators aim to point out the ways in which we are unique — or at least special. Research evaluation, in part, should be about making researchers aware of their own impacts. Research evaluation shouldn’t be punitive, it should be instructive — or at least an opportunity to learn. Research evaluation shouldn’t so much seek to steer research as it should empower researchers to drive their research along the road to impact. Although everyone likes big changes (as long as they’re positive), local impacts should be valued as world-changing, too. Diversity of approaches should also be valued. Any approach to research evaluation that insists we all need to do the same thing is way off track, in my opinion.

I apologize to anyone who was expecting a slick account that lays out the recipe for Snowflake Indicators. I’m not trying to establish rules here. Nor am I insisting that anything goes (there are no rules).  If anything, I am engaged in rule-seeking — something as difficult to grasp and hold on to as a snowflake.